Category Archives: Best Practice

Survey design tip: scales

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Likert. Likert-style. Positive. Negative. Words. Numbers. There is so much about scales for surveys that can be so confusing when you get right down to it. Truth be told, choosing the right scales and right scale setup for your questions in your survey can be both easier than expected and tougher than expected. Let’s look at how scale selection and… Read more »

Survey design tip: survey length

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Whether you’ve written surveys for decades or are just beginning, the question or survey length is one that’s been around for quite some time, but probably not quite as prevalent an issue as it has become in the past few years. With survey participants increasingly participating via mobile devices, the question of length has become pretty widely debated.

Alternatives to “why?”

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A few weeks ago, I came across a tweet that made me pause and affected how I set up a recent interview guide for conducting open-ended interviews. I’ve been fascinated by the results. Perhaps it will change your approach, too.

Survey design tip: fielding

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If you’ve followed the previous few weeks’ worth of survey design tips, you might notice I’ve been spending a lot of time in the efforts and questions that should be answered before you even start writing the survey. There’s a reason for that – taking the time up front to address these items will save time and effort in the… Read more »

Survey design tip: what will you do with the data?

will you act on the feedback

So far, in the weekly series about survey design tips, I’ve covered establishing the primary purpose for your survey; identifying your target audience for your survey; defining the different data cuts you want when you get the data back. Today, I want to delve a bit into the question of what will be done with the data once it’s gathered…. Read more »

Survey design tip: how will you slice the data?

When it comes to the survey design, things can get complicated quickly. (I think there’s an exponential curve to the level of complication around survey design based on the number of individuals involved in the survey design.) The aim of these survey design tips is to help you reduce the level of complication, regardless the number of people involved. So,… Read more »

Writing unbiased survey questions

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Last week, I wrote about the most important step for survey writing: acquiring a razor-sharp focus for the study being designed. At the end of that post, I promised that this week’s survey design tip would focus on some tips for writing survey questions. With that in mind, let’s look at the first set of tips to address what I… Read more »

The most important step to survey writing

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Last week, I wrote a post about eliminating bias in decision-making, and introducing the topic of using surveys to help inform decisions. At the end of the post, I addressed the fact that writing surveys is a difficult thing to do, promising follow-on posts with tips for writing better surveys. This week, we’re kicking off the series with the first,… Read more »

How do you make decisions?

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One of the things I enjoy doing is taking personality tests. Inevitably, it seems that during the test, there will be some question or series of questions that deals with how you make decisions, and they always seems to make it out to be two types of decision-making: go with your gut, or research everything to death. I never have… Read more »

First, psychology studies – is #MRX next?

scrutiny on research

August 27, an article was published in the New York Times detailing the efforts of a team called the Reproducibility Project to replicate findings from psychology studies published in reputable journals (and by reputable, I’m referring to peer-reviewed journals like Science). In short, the results for a number of those studies could not be recreated, casting something of a pall… Read more »